Book Review: Children of Blood and Bone

Trigger/Content Warnings: Violence, sexual assault, physical assault, murder, themes of racism/brutality against black bodies, emotional abuse, parental abuse, slavery.


A1agLFsWkOLOfficial Blurb:

They killed my mother.
They took our magic.
They tried to bury us.

Now we rise.

Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls.

But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope.

Now Zélie has one chance to bring back magic and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must outwit and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good.

Danger lurks in Orïsha, where snow leoponaires prowl and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to control her powers and her growing feelings for an enemy.

My Take: 5/5 Stars

I teach you to be warriors in the garden so you will never be gardeners in the war.” ~ Tomi Adeyemi

I feel like I have to premise this post by telling you about how much I admire Tomi Adeyemi. Number one, she’s a Harvard grad which always impresses me (I’m a snob, I’ll admit it). Number two, she was only 24 years old when this book, her debut, came out and hit the NYT Bestsellers List at NUMBER ONE. It’s been on The List for 61 consecutive weeks. And she was even YOUNGER when she landed her record-setting, three-book deal. Also, I’ve listened to her on several podcasts and the like, and she’s brilliant and inspirational.

So why did it take me so long to get to this read if I admire her so much and KNEW this book would land on my Five Star list? Well, because I’m kind of a jerk about big books these days (I know, it’s ridiculous, I used to adore big books but as I get older I just… hesitate), and this book was a TOME on my front door. I had it pre-ordered (naturally) and was so excited when it arrived. Then I opened it and… it was bigger than I expected.

Anyway, I have been trying to break myself of this stupid, new fear over big books by getting them on audiobook, which I did for CHILDREN OF BLOOD AND BONE, and I’m actually SUPER glad I listened to this one. It’s narrated by Bahni Turpin who is one of my favorite audiobook narrators in general, but this was the best performance of hers I’ve heard thus far. It was magical. Bahni SINGS in this book, and I seriously never wanted her to stop. I wanted her to sing me the entire book. I wanted someone to put her on a stage and make this into a single-player performance. It would be long, I admit, but maybe we could do like a fifteen-part series? Please? I know the book has sold movie rights, but can someone cast Bahni? It was such an amazing listen. Also, I just looked Bahni up to see who I’d cast her as, and she’s gorgeous and would TOTALLY be an amazing mom to Zélie, just saying. If anyone at Fox 2000 stumbles upon this gushing rant, you can take this idea.

Ahem… back to the book. Children of Blood and Bone was as magical as Bahni’s performance of it, naturally. It had me from page one. One of the hardest things about writing a book, somewhat weirdly, is finding the right place to start it. This book had about the best starting point of anything I’ve read in recent memory, which made my writing brain happy.

That wasn’t all, either. Stylistically, this book was smart. Because I don’t do spoilers here, I won’t get into anything too complicated, but I will say that there are creatures in Adeyemi’s book that are constructed in a way that had me going, “Wow, that’s really brilliant what she did there.” The way she constructed her world, and her characters, had me really thinking about how much work she put into the writing of this novel.

Yet with all its smart style and flashy world building, what resonates probably the most with the reader is characterization. Adeyemi’s characters stick with you. They’re delightfully messy, fully rounded, and totally relatable. Even the villain. This book is written in three points of view and each one brings you a different worldview, all as understandable and complicated as the next. Through the different lenses she uses, Adeyemi brilliant fleshes out the complications of her world, and ours. Again, smart.

Needless to say, I adored this book. But forewarning, it did end on an aching cliffhanger. Good news though, the next book Virtue and Vengeance, is slated to release in December of this year. And yes, I have it preordered already!

Tuesday’s Question: Who is your favorite audiobook narrator?

Buy Links:

Amazon

Audible 

iTunes

Barnes & Noble

❤ Aimee

 

Book Review: King of Scars

Author’s Note: For those who are new here, and because I’ve never said it explicitly before, all my five-star-only reviews are non-spoiler reviews. I list the official blurb, then I talk about maybe the prose, maybe a brief overview of the content, but mostly how the book made me feel, and who I’d recommend it for. That said, I know this book is brand spanking new (less new by the time this auto posts but still), and I don’t want to spoil anything (even just feelings), so please feel free to pass over this one. It will not hurt my feelings at all. Seriously. I avoided Twitter and Instagram for a week while I finished reading this. I get it.

King of ScarsOfficial Blurb: Face your demons…or feed them.

Nikolai Lantsov has always had a gift for the impossible. No one knows what he endured in his country’s bloody civil war―and he intends to keep it that way. Now, as enemies gather at his weakened borders, the young king must find a way to refill Ravka’s coffers, forge new alliances, and stop a rising threat to the once-great Grisha Army.

Yet with every day a dark magic within him grows stronger, threatening to destroy all he has built. With the help of a young monk and a legendary Grisha Squaller, Nikolai will journey to the places in Ravka where the deepest magic survives to vanquish the terrible legacy inside him. He will risk everything to save his country and himself. But some secrets aren’t meant to stay buried―and some wounds aren’t meant to heal.

My Take: 5/5 Stars

“If men were ashamed when they should be, they’d have no time for anything else.” ~ Leigh Bardugo

KING OF SCARS was my most anticipated read of 2019, and it did not disappoint. For those who haven’t yet been introduced to the Grishaverse, get acquainted (start with the Shadow and Bone trilogy, then move on to the Six of Crows duology), then find your way back here. Also, know that I’m jealous you get to read these fabulous books with fresh eyes.

For those who don’t know, Leigh Bardugo is one of my favorite authors of all time. I literally took the day off work to start in on King of Scars. When it arrived, I ran to the door, grabbed the package from off the floor (while the astounded Amazon deliveryman stared at me with wide, blinking eyes) and started to scream. I mean, little kid on Christmas scream. Between these giggles and high pitched shrieks, I thanked the man, dashed inside, and continued to dance around my living room and kitchen, clutching the package and hopping up and down like a little bird trying to take flight. I was that excited.

I was this excited because Leigh Bardugo, without fail, writes stories I want to read, stories I feel were made just for me. Her characters are rich and her world building beautiful. She explores things I’m interested in: different cultures and customs; different languages; different relationships; different loves. But most of all, she is honest. Her writing is honest, and so are her realities. Even in a fantasy realm, she doesn’t cop-out. She doesn’t engage in dishonest tropes and parlor tricks simply to appease the masses. She keeps it real. Oh, and she’s funny. Did I mention how funny her writing can be?

King of Scars was no different. Within the first chapter, I was transported. Whisked away, back to Ravka, back to Nikolai, back to the home of the Grisha. I loved King of Scars because it was familiar in a way that Leigh’s writing has become familiar to me. It’s not only the characters, but it’s the truth she speaks. It’s a familiarity that changes,  too evolving naturally, because Leigh is one of those writers who seems to always get better. With every story she spins, I see her evolution as a writer, and to me, that is more enchanting even than the Grishaverse. Leigh is the kind of author I aspire to be. And King of Scars is the kind of book I want to write. Let’s just hope that when I do, I can get a cover half as eye catching!

Buy Links:

Amazon

iTunes

Barnes & Noble (where you can get an exclusive edition)

How did everyone feel about Leigh’s new book? And tell me, what is your most anticipated read of the year?

❤ Aimee