Diversity Check In

I met my Goodreads goal for the year (which was 50 books) so I figured it was time for a diversity check in! Don’t know what that is because you’re new around here? Well click here and you’ll get the scoop about what this is and why I’m doing it!

I think I’ve done pretty well this time around, but we shall seeeee!

Books Read in 2019: 55 (A nod to Audible, couldn’t have done it without you. Side note: Audiobooks count as books read, don’t @ me. Also, in the spirit of this being a post about celebrating diversity and trying to expand our reading horizons, it’s sort of ableist to contend that only physical books read count as books read, just saying).

Books by Female Authors: 46 (I feel like I can probably go ahead and stop counting this one from here on out).

Books by POC Authors: 17 (This equates to around 31% of the books I read. According to the US Census Bureau, about 41.8% of the population identifies as a person of color, so I still need to get this up if I want to read to reflect the world around me).

Books by LGBTQIA+ Authors: 6 (As usual, I note that not all of these numbers may be accurate as some of these authors may choose to keep their personal lives out of the public sphere).

Books by Authors with Disabilities: 1 (This continues to be an area that is hard to discern and lacking in my reading choices, as it turns out. I also am unsure if I include mental illness in this category or give it its own category, but that’s another thing that is harder to discern without really digging into people’s personal stories which isn’t something, as an author myself, I’m keen to do, unless the author is very open about it).

Books by Authors who are Non-Christian: 4 (This is another one I need to work on, but I do have a couple up on the docket for this month/next month so hopefully this number will go up a bit).

So all in all, I’m getting better about reading books by POC (though there’s still clearly a lot of room for improvement) but still need to continue seeking out books by LGBTQIA+ authors, those with disabilities, and non-Christian authors. Additionally, I’ve realized I haven’t read a SINGLE book by an indigenous author this whole year, so if you have one you loved, please hit me up in the comments!

❤ Always,

Aimee

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Book Review: Monday’s Not Coming

Trigger/Content Warnings: Domestic violence, child abuse, child neglect, homophobia, bullying, missing persons.


41xccpePQhL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_Official Blurb: 

Monday Charles is missing, and only Claudia seems to notice. Claudia and Monday have always been inseparable—more sisters than friends. So when Monday doesn’t turn up for the first day of school, Claudia’s worried.

When she doesn’t show for the second day, or second week, Claudia knows that something is wrong. Monday wouldn’t just leave her to endure tests and bullies alone. Not after last year’s rumors and not with her grades on the line. Now Claudia needs her best—and only—friend more than ever. But Monday’s mother refuses to give Claudia a straight answer, and Monday’s sister April is even less help.

As Claudia digs deeper into her friend’s disappearance, she discovers that no one seems to remember the last time they saw Monday. How can a teenage girl just vanish without anyone noticing that she’s gone?

My Take: 5/5 Stars

Rumors are born with legs that can run a mile in less than a minute. Rumors eat up dreams without condiments. Rumors do not have expiration dates. Rumors can be deadly. Rumors can get you killed

~ Tiffany D. Jackson

Tiffany Jackson’s MONDAY’S NOT COMING is outside my usual reading lane. I bought it on sale on Audible because it was recommended by Audible and because the blurb sounded interesting. It is proof that I should read outside my usual reading lane more often. It blew my mind and broke my heart.

Monday’s Not Coming is the type of book that lingers. It sticks with you, hovering there in the back of your mind. It is a cool chill against the skin. It’s the type of book that makes you wonder. What does it mean? What is it trying to say? It’s the type of book that you have to unpack and unravel slowly, over time. It’s a book made for discussion and debate. It’s a book full of characters you will want to hold close and protect. Mainly because you can’t.

This book is so full of love it hurts to turn the pages. Love and grief and twists. You know, in your heart of hearts, where it’s going. You know and yet… you wish you didn’t. You hope you don’t. You cling onto the fragile prayers of the main character as if they are your own. The only you want is to be wrong. It is beautiful and compelling and haunting in so many ways.

It’s really hard to talk about Monday’s Not Coming without spoiling anything because once I find myself talking about it I don’t want to stop. I want to pour out all my feelings and I can’t do that without explaining away so much of what gives this book its power. So I won’t. I will just say that you should read it. Then tell all your friends to read it, too, because you’re going to want someone to discuss it with.

What about you? Do you like a good discussion book? If so, who do you discuss books with?

Buy Links:

Amazon

Audible

iTunes

Barnes & Noble

❤ Always,

Aimee

 

Book Review: On the Come Up

Trigger/Content Warnings: Gang violence, gun violence, poverty, drug abuse/addiction.

Author’s Note: So I finished listening to this book awhile ago and wrote a post to be scheduled, that apparently disappeared. Or I didn’t save. I’m unsure which but when I went to refer a friend by linking to the post and found it wasn’t there, I realized it was something I must rectify immediately. Sorry for the delay!


35068618Official Blurb: Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least win her first battle. As the daughter of an underground hip hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri’s got massive shoes to fill.

But it’s hard to get your come up when you’re labeled a hoodlum at school, and your fridge at home is empty after your mom loses her job. So Bri pours her anger and frustration into her first song, which goes viral…for all the wrong reasons.

Bri soon finds herself at the center of a controversy, portrayed by the media as more menace than MC. But with an eviction notice staring her family down, Bri doesn’t just want to make it—she has to. Even if it means becoming the very thing the public has made her out to be.

Insightful, unflinching, and full of heart, On the Come Up is an ode to hip hop from one of the most influential literary voices of a generation. It is the story of fighting for your dreams, even as the odds are stacked against you; and about how, especially for young black people, freedom of speech isn’t always free.

My Take: 5/5 Stars

All these folks I’ve never met became gods over my life. Now I gotta take the power back. ~Angie Thomas

ON THE COME UP, Angie Thomas’s second novel, coming on the heels of her heartbreaking and powerful debut, THE HATE U GIVE, did not disappoint. In fact, if I’m honest, ON THE COME UP was better than THUG in a lot of ways, which is saying a lot.

The book, which I listened to, and which is narrated by the oh-so-talented Bahni Turpin, features an honest main character who is so true it’s almost painful. She’s funny, she’s sassy, she’s smart as can be, and she has a deep, deep heart hidden beneath a steel exterior. She’s a character the reader cannot help but fall in love with almost from page one.

Though The Hate U Give and On the Come Up aren’t related in the sense that they’re a series, they are intrinsically linked. On the Come Up takes place after the closing scene of THUG and does have references to the incidents peppered throughout the book, though you would not need to read The Hate U Give to understand On the Come Up. Yet the most brilliant way in which they are linked, for me, is the order in which they were published. It felt like THUG had to exist first, before On the Come Up could be brought into this world. It felt like Starr made a path for Bri in the world of publishing, and while that hurts to even type, I couldn’t help but be reminded of it throughout the work. As a white person, both books made me question myself and my biases and further examine things I thought I knew but didn’t. But I don’t know if the questions I asked in On the Come Up would have been the same had I not read THUG first. The order in which these books were written is not necessarily something an author should have to think about or concern herself over when writing the books of her heart, but the fact that Thomas did should also not be glossed over. It further highlights her brilliance in capturing a moment and a life and peeling away layers of humanity.

The thing I loved most about On the Come Up, however, is Bri’s voice. Bri is a rapper and she travels throughout the world of the story in a melodic way. Even her insults have a certain song to them. The language of this book tripped and flowed in a way that was deeply pleasing to listen to (and I’m sure read). It was also what made me enjoy this second novel of Thomas’s even more than her first. Good language will almost always win me over, and this language was stellar.

THUG was always going to be a hard act to follow. Everyone knew that. But Thomas, much like Bri, was sure to tell the world and its expectations of failure that she would not be silenced, and thank God for that.

Buy Links:

Amazon

Audible

iTunes

Barnes & Noble

For those who have read both, which did you prefer?

❤ Always, Aimee