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Book Review: Sky in the Deep

Trigger/Content Warnings: Violence, graphic scenes of torture, animal sacrifice/death, sexual assault, discussion of sexual assault/rape.


41s62HDbBcL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_Official Blurb:

OND ELDR. BREATHE FIRE.

Raised to be a warrior, seventeen-year-old Eelyn fights alongside her Aska clansmen in an ancient, rivalry against the Riki clan. Her life is brutal but simple: fight and survive. Until the day she sees the impossible on the battlefield―her brother, fighting with the enemy―the brother she watched die five years ago.

Faced with her brother’s betrayal, she must survive the winter in the mountains with the Riki, in a village where every neighbor is an enemy, every battle scar possibly one she delivered. But when the Riki village is raided by a ruthless clan thought to be a legend, Eelyn is even more desperate to get back to her beloved family.

She is given no choice but to trust Fiske, her brother’s friend, who sees her as a threat. They must do the impossible: unite the clans to fight together, or risk being slaughtered one by one. Driven by a love for her clan and her growing love for Fiske, Eelyn must confront her own definition of loyalty and family while daring to put her faith in the people she’s spent her life hating.

My Take: 5/5 Stars

“We find things, just as we lose things.” ~ Adrienne Young

SKY IN THE DEEP, for all its violence, is a bit of a quiet read. It moves quickly with its short chapters, but digs deep into the main character’s emotions. It deals with subjects that are heavy but poignant: family; loss; and most especially, the idea of othering. Who is really other, the book seems to ask.

At the core of the novel is an enemies to lovers romance trope, one of my favorites, but it goes beyond that, too. The story is about sacrifice and learning to realize how we define “enemy” and how flimsy that concept can be sometimes. It is a quiet reflection on the bias we hold because we were raised to hold it, a tough yet important subject set in a high fantasy world inspired by Viking lore, where it is perhaps easier to examine.

Sky in the Deep isn’t necessarily a book I would traditionally give five stars, because quiet books tend not to be my personal favorite, but this one was buoyed by a character who struck me deeply for one simple fact. She was not afraid to cry. Eelyn is a warrior, trained to kill her enemy without mercy since she was a toddler. Yet she cries on page–well, a lot–for lack of a more delicate way to say it. At first, I found it irritating, then I realized that by allowing her character this sensitivity, this vulnerability, Adrienne Young was doing something quite spectacular — she was giving us more than a warrior. She was giving us femininity in many of its possible forms, which is something I often find lacking in high-powered fantasy featuring lady warriors. Women warriors in literature tend to mirror their male counterparts by refusing to shed a tear. When they do cry, they are frequently critiqued by readers for doing so (NOT that I think that’s how men should be instructed to act, either), and I’ve often questioned this tendency. Are we being good feminists by making our females mirrors of men? Or are we being reactionary by saying, “I can do anything you can do.” Which is true, women can, but in my opinion, they should also do it in their own way. They should be strong in a way that is true to them. And Eeyln, remarkably, was.

So for this quiet book with a lot to say, I raise my glass and say well done. I cannot wait to read the next.

Question of the day: What’s the last quiet book you read and loved?

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❤ Aimee

Book Review: Spin the Dawn

Trigger/Content Warnings: War, PTSD, disabilities caused by war, fire, general mild violence.


51s0ENhtkLL._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_Official Blurb: Maia Tamarin dreams of becoming the greatest tailor in the land, but as a girl, the best she can hope for is to marry well. When a royal messenger summons her ailing father, once a tailor of renown, to court, Maia poses as a boy and takes his place. She knows her life is forfeit if her secret is discovered, but she’ll take that risk to achieve her dream and save her family from ruin. There’s just one catch: Maia is one of twelve tailors vying for the job.

Backstabbing and lies run rampant as the tailors compete in challenges to prove their artistry and skill. Maia’s task is further complicated when she draws the attention of the court magician, Edan, whose piercing eyes seem to see straight through her disguise.

And nothing could have prepared her for the final challenge: to sew three magic gowns for the emperor’s reluctant bride-to-be, from the laughter of the sun, the tears of the moon, and the blood of stars. With this impossible task before her, she embarks on a journey to the far reaches of the kingdom, seeking the sun, the moon, and the stars, and finding more than she ever could have imagined.

Steeped in Chinese culture, sizzling with forbidden romance, and shimmering with magic, this young adult fantasy is pitch-perfect for fans of Sarah J. Maas or Renée Ahdieh.

My Take: 5/5 Stars

“Don’t become the kite that never flies.” ~ Elizabeth Lim

This review is long overdue because SPIN THE DAWN, Elizabeth Lim’s stunning debut, was my favorite read for the month of August. I was originally attracted to Spin the Dawn because of its beautiful cover but also the fact that it was blurbed by Tamora Pierce. Tamora Pierce is one of my favorite authors of all time and she does not blurb many books, so my curiosity was piqued seeing her praise of this one. So, even though I wasn’t 100% sure on the blurb (due to the fact that I’m not so into fashion), I grabbed a copy on sale at Barnes & Noble.

Guys, this book is not really about fashion. I mean, it IS. The main character’s main goal is to become the royal tailor. Problem is, she’s a girl, and only a man can occupy that position. But there is SO much more going on in this book than a Project Runway styled competition. This book is SO much more than a Mulan retelling (although it is that and it’s such an interesting take). When I was about one third of the way through, I understood why Tamora Pierce had blurbed it: the book is paced like one of hers. And if you don’t know what I mean by that, I mean it is FAST. Elizabeth Lim has a way with handling time. She manages to put a lot of information and time and action and adventure into not a lot of pages. It’s definitely what I admired most about this book.

My second favorite aspect of Spin the Dawn was the heart-pumping, butterfly-inducing, swoon-worthy romance. If you’ve been around here long enough you know I am a SUCKER for a good romance, and this one was excellent. I don’t want to spoil it, so I won’t go into details, but trust me, it was good.

Overall, I’d recommend this book to fans of Tamora Pierce and Sarah J. Maas, or anyone who loves Project Runway, or anyone who enjoys a great, high-paced fantasy with lots of romance, orrrrr anyone at all, really. Seriously, it’s good, go get it!

Question of the day: Who is an author you admire for his/her/their skills when it comes to pacing?

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❤ Aimee

Book Review: Nevernight

Trigger/Content Warnings: Extreme violence, gore, death. Violence toward children, child death, animal abuse and death, extreme brutality, sexual content, and prostitution. Emotional manipulation, use of sex as a weapon, torture, and slavery.


51PXn+wAl2LOfficial Blurb: In a land where three suns almost never set, a fledgling killer joins a school of assassins, seeking vengeance against the powers who destroyed her family.

Daughter of an executed traitor, Mia Corvere is barely able to escape her father’s failed rebellion with her life. Alone and friendless, she hides in a city built from the bones of a dead god, hunted by the Senate and her father’s former comrades. But her gift for speaking with the shadows leads her to the door of a retired killer, and a future she never imagined.

Now, a sixteen year old Mia is apprenticed to the deadliest flock of assassins in the entire Republic — the Red Church. Treachery and trials await her with the Church’s halls, and to fail is to die. But if she survives to initiation, Mia will be inducted among the chosen of the Lady of Blessed Murder, and one step closer to the only thing she desires.

My Take: 5/5 Stars

“The books we love, they love us back. And just as we mark our places in the pages, those pages leave their marks on us.” ~ Jay Kristoff

Mia Corvere, the main character of Jay Kristoff’s NEVERNIGHT, is the anti-heroine any writer worth his/her/their salt salivates over. Mia is feisty, strong, powerful, and murderous, yet she never loses her humanity (or her charm). Her motivation is clear, as are her goals. She is focused, but not mechanical. She makes mistakes and wrong choices. But we never stop rooting for her.

From almost the first page—actually—from the first page, I was hooked. Kristoff is a master of his craft. His writing is descriptive but not wordy, blunt but not boring, and darkly humorous. It sucks you in and spits you back out begging for more. More Mia, more Mr. Kindly, more violence and brutality and blood.

Nevernight was so good that as soon as I closed my Audible app on book one, I immediately began book two, Godsgrave. Yes, I did listen to it, and yes, I did love the narrator, though I have heard mixed reviews on him with this book. Personally, I thought Holter Graham gave the story a bit more magic and mystery. I felt like I was listening to a grand narrator of a play. He made it sound like theater, and for this particular story, I thought it was more than appropriate.

I will make a special note for this book, however, as I’ve seen this come up on multiple occasions. Nevernight is NOT young adult. It is an adult book with a protagonist who is a young adult. These are not the same thing. This book is incredibly violent, has explicit sex scenes, and is full of cursing and dark jokes. If these are not your cup of tea, I promise you, you will not like this book. Be warned.

As for me, September 3rd and the release of the final book of the trilogy, Darkdawn, cannot come soon enough!

Question of the day: What’s your most anticipated fall release?

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❤ Aimee

Do Audiobooks “Count”?

Woo! Something bookish (besides a book review) to talk about two weeks in a row! Look at me!

So let’s get right down to today’s topic. Do audiobooks count as books read?

Spoiler alert: Yes. They do. And to be honest, I’m not really sure why this is an issue I keep seeing come up, but I do, and it’s starting to get me a little feisty, so here’s my take on it all.

First off, “reading” a book basically means absorbing it, understanding it. When we’re tested on reading comprehension we’re not tested on can. you. read. each. of. these. individual. words. We’re tested on can you string these words into a sentence and understand them. You don’t actually have to physically read the words with your eyes to string them into a sentence and understand them. Simply put, reading is not a physical act you need sight to complete.

Which leads me to my second point which is: it is ableist as hell to tell someone that audiobooks don’t “count” as reading. What about blind folks? Do they have to get a book in Braille for it to count, per this silly rule? Do you know how few physical books there are that are produced in Braille? And how expensive they are? A copy of The Hobbit is $72.95. Want a more recent young adult book? A copy of Ash Princess is $97.95. Game of Thrones$239.95. Audiobooks are expensive, too, don’t get me wrong, but they’re more widely available, and there are many more library options.

It’s not only blind people who this nonsense excludes, either. “Not counting” audiobooks also hurts people who have learning disabilities like dyslexia and ADHD. Audiobooks are often used as an alternative method of teaching for kids (and adults) whose brains aren’t neurotypical. Just because some people mix letters up doesn’t mean they’re not able to comprehend stories and information. It doesn’t mean they don’t count.

I think this is really why this issue fires me up, to be perfectly honest. Because by saying audiobooks don’t “count,” it feels like people are saying those for whom audiobooks are the only viable (or affordable or accessible) option don’t “count” when they in fact do. Very much. They’re just as much a part of the literary community as everyone else. I want them as part of my audience (although I can’t afford to produce an audiobook at this stage in my self-published career). I want everyone as part of my audience. I want that tent to be as wide and welcoming as possible. I don’t care how you absorb stories; I only care that you do.

Ableism is point one and the most important, but point two is time. Some people don’t have time to read as much as they’d like (or at all). Single parrents, workaholic types, people having to hold multiple jobs, people doing school and work, those with long commutes, the people who might make up this category are endless. As you get older and take on more and more responsibilities, you have less and less free time. And what free time you have is precious. Maybe you’re trying to get that side hustle going. Maybe you need to spend more time with your partner or children. Maybe you’re just too damn tired from struggling that you can’t make the words turn into sentences at the end of a sixteen-hour day. Audiobooks give you back a little bit of free time because you can read and do other things. I listen to audiobooks on my long commute, at the gym, while I’m cooking dinner, taking the dog on a walk, cleaning my house, etc. All things that need to happen, all things that cut into the time I have to read a physical book. To have the luxury to have so much free time that you can choose not to “count” audiobooks is a privilege, plain and simple.

Final point on why audiobooks definitely count as books read: because not counting them is silly, really. I recently listened to Furyborn by Claire Legrand on audiobook. I wasn’t taken with the narrator, so I read the sequel, Kingsbane, in hardback. Shockingly, I didn’t have to go back and read Furyborn in hardback to understand Kingsbane. I simply picked up the book, opened the cover, and started to read. This is because I’d read it by listening to it. I mean, this is not that complicated.

So, at the end of the day, this is my word problem: According to Goodreads, Aimee has read 55 books this year. If 27 of them were audiobooks, how many books has Aimee read this year?

Answer: Aimee has read 55 books this year.

As always, be kind to yourself, and keep at those Goodreads goals, however you reach them!

❤ Aimee

Mamas Last Hug
Bookstagram photograph from @writingwaimee of audiobook version of Mama’s Last Hug by Frans de Waal surrounded by red butterflies.

 

 

Book Review: The Hunger Games

Trigger/Content Warnings: Violence, violence toward children, child death, child mutilation, sexual assault, war, poverty, starvation, depression, suicidal ideation and thought, PTSD.


41ir9m8QQnL._SX332_BO1,204,203,200_Official Blurb: In the ruins of a place once known as North America lies the nation of Panem, a shining Capitol surrounded by twelve outlying districts. Long ago the districts waged war on the Capitol and were defeated. As part of the surrender terms, each district agreed to send one boy and one girl to appear in an annual televised event called, “The Hunger Games,” a fight to the death on live TV. Sixteen-year-old Katniss Everdeen, who lives alone with her mother and younger sister, regards it as a death sentence when she is forced to represent her district in the Games. The terrain, rules, and level of audience participation may change but one thing is constant: kill or be killed.

 

My Take: 5/5 Stars for overall series, 5/5 for The Hunger Games, 5/5 for Catching Fire, 4/5 for Mockingjay.

Stupid people are dangerous.

~ Suzanne Collins

I know, I know, I know. What rock have I been hiding under? To be honest, I hesitated to even post this review because … old news, seriously. However, I am a little lean on five star books these days (partly my fault for not making the time to read and partly a bit of a slump I think) and this series is really very good, so I wanted to post a Five Star Series Review.

The thing that works the best for me about this series is the subtlety of the evolution of Katniss’s character. It’s like a slow burn character arc that by book three makes you feel completely wrung out, right along with Katniss. But it’s magical the way it works because it sneaks up on you so you don’t even really notice it’s happening. With all the violence in this book, the character arc is very light-handed. It works brilliantly which is good because honestly, with all the violence this series brings to it, if a single other thing was heavy handed, I don’t know that the series would be readable.

In addition to the character arc of the whole series, The Hunger Games in particular, but also Catching Fire are brilliantly paced. I read them both in one day each because I could hardly put them down (even having watched the movies and therefore knowing what was coming). The world building is equally as interesting and dynamic, again, even having watched the movies. The contrast between the Districts, and the Capitol, and then the arena, is striking. I honestly wish we had a spinoff though that took me on a tour of some of the other Districts, particularly four and seven (Finnick and Johanna’s Districts). I guess this is what fanfiction is for!

But everyone who follows this blog knows the final word on “good book” is whether you have a book hangover when it’s all said and done. And let me tell you, by the time I got to the end of Mockingjay I felt like I might not be in any shape to read for at least a week. It was SUCH an intense ride. And if a series can do that to you when you know how it all ends, then it’s definitely doing something right!

What’s an older backlist series you really want to read but haven’t gotten to yet?

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❤ Always,

Aimee

 

 

 

Diversity Check In

I met my Goodreads goal for the year (which was 50 books) so I figured it was time for a diversity check in! Don’t know what that is because you’re new around here? Well click here and you’ll get the scoop about what this is and why I’m doing it!

I think I’ve done pretty well this time around, but we shall seeeee!

Books Read in 2019: 55 (A nod to Audible, couldn’t have done it without you. Side note: Audiobooks count as books read, don’t @ me. Also, in the spirit of this being a post about celebrating diversity and trying to expand our reading horizons, it’s sort of ableist to contend that only physical books read count as books read, just saying).

Books by Female Authors: 46 (I feel like I can probably go ahead and stop counting this one from here on out).

Books by POC Authors: 17 (This equates to around 31% of the books I read. According to the US Census Bureau, about 41.8% of the population identifies as a person of color, so I still need to get this up if I want to read to reflect the world around me).

Books by LGBTQIA+ Authors: 6 (As usual, I note that not all of these numbers may be accurate as some of these authors may choose to keep their personal lives out of the public sphere).

Books by Authors with Disabilities: 1 (This continues to be an area that is hard to discern and lacking in my reading choices, as it turns out. I also am unsure if I include mental illness in this category or give it its own category, but that’s another thing that is harder to discern without really digging into people’s personal stories which isn’t something, as an author myself, I’m keen to do, unless the author is very open about it).

Books by Authors who are Non-Christian: 4 (This is another one I need to work on, but I do have a couple up on the docket for this month/next month so hopefully this number will go up a bit).

So all in all, I’m getting better about reading books by POC (though there’s still clearly a lot of room for improvement) but still need to continue seeking out books by LGBTQIA+ authors, those with disabilities, and non-Christian authors. Additionally, I’ve realized I haven’t read a SINGLE book by an indigenous author this whole year, so if you have one you loved, please hit me up in the comments!

❤ Always,

Aimee

woman-789146_1920

 

Book Review: Furyborn

Trigger/Content Warnings: Violence, parental neglect, emotional abuse (parental), sexual assault.


51cl1gq0zuL._SX332_BO1,204,203,200_Official Blurb:  When assassins ambush her best friend, Rielle Dardenne risks everything to save him, exposing herself as one of a pair of prophesied queens: a queen of light, and a queen of blood. To prove she is the Sun Queen, Rielle must endure seven elemental magic trials. If she fails, she will be executed…unless the trials kill her first.

One thousand years later, the legend of Queen Rielle is a fairy tale to Eliana Ferracora. A bounty hunter for the Undying Empire, Eliana believes herself untouchable―until her mother vanishes. To find her, Eliana joins a rebel captain and discovers that the evil at the empire’s heart is more terrible than she ever imagined.

As Rielle and Eliana fight in a cosmic war that spans millennia, their stories intersect, and the shocking connections between them ultimately determine the fate of their world―and of each other.

My Take: 5/5 Stars

Some say the Queen was frightened in her last moments. But I like to think that she was angry.

~ Claire Legrand

Those who know me know that I am a sucker for elemental magic. My own books are about elemental magic. The very first manuscript I ever wrote, at the tender age of twelve, featured a mage who could wield all six elements within my magic system, so when I read the blurb of FURYBORN, I was all in.

Furyborn turned out to have so much more intricacy than simply its magic system, though. The storytelling was impressive. The book is written from two points of view, two women with powers who live a thousand years apart. Yet, as their stories weave in and out of one another and start to come together, the reader has no choice but to find herself in awe of the net she’s been pulled into. It’s a book that unravels itself, and leaves the reader thinking about it long after the pages are done. One of those books that almost demands a reread now that you understand it in its entirety. It’s spectacularly well done.

In addition to the magical way the story unwinds itself, the characters are unique and dynamic. Their development through book one is smooth and well-integrated. Even knowing what the reader knows about the characters at the outset, she can’t help but be sucked into the dramas of their lives (and trust me, their lives ARE dramatic). Legrand pulls the reader along, wending through the twists and turns of the character arc of each of her point of view characters as they crisscross one another like comets shooting in opposing directions. As a reader, you want to know more about these characters. You want to follow them, so as a writer, Legrand definitely knocked this one out of the park.

Furyborn is dark, though, definitely at the upper spectrum of young adult into the new adult territory. But if you’re into elemental magic and inspired plotting, this book is for you.

If you could have only one elemental power, what would it be?

Buy Links:

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❤ Always,

Aimee

Book Review: Mama’s Last Hug

Trigger/Content Warnings: Some discussion of animal abuse and animal testing/experimentation.


51Vq4GOKWLL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_Official Blurb: 

Primatologist Frans de Waal explores the fascinating world of animal and human emotions.

Frans de Waal has spent four decades at the forefront of animal research. Following up on the best-selling Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?, which investigated animal intelligence, Mama’s Last Hug delivers a fascinating exploration of the rich emotional lives of animals.

Mama’s Last Hug begins with the death of Mama, a chimpanzee matriarch who formed a deep bond with biologist Jan van Hooff. When Mama was dying, van Hooff took the unusual step of visiting her in her night cage for a last hug. Their goodbyes were filmed and went viral. Millions of people were deeply moved by the way Mama embraced the professor, welcoming him with a big smile while reassuring him by patting his neck, in a gesture often considered typically human but that is in fact common to all primates. This story and others like it form the core of de Waal’s argument, showing that humans are not the only species with the capacity for love, hate, fear, shame, guilt, joy, disgust, and empathy.

De Waal discusses facial expressions, the emotions behind human politics, the illusion of free will, animal sentience, and, of course, Mama’s life and death. The message is one of continuity between us and other species, such as the radical proposal that emotions are like organs: we don’t have a single organ that other animals don’t have, and the same is true for our emotions. Mama’s Last Hug opens our hearts and minds to the many ways in which humans and other animals are connected, transforming how we view the living world around us.

My Take: 5/5 Stars

The heart has reasons of which reason knows nothing

~ Frans de Waal

MAMA’S LAST HUG was recommended to me by my father, an environmental engineer who reads … well, not that much. Because of this, I was over the moon excited to get a book recommendation from him, and his recommendation did not disappoint.

This book is for animal lovers everywhere. While it focuses on primates and primate relationships and emotions (including the pivotal primate: us), it delves deep into the emotions (separate and distinct from feelings) of all mammals as well as birds and fish. As a dog lover, I especially enjoyed the bits about our canine companions, and it was interesting to see de Waal’s take on some research conducted by canine behaviorists whose work I’d read (such as Patricia McConnell and Alexandra Horowitz).

Mama’s Last Hug wasn’t all facts and research and science, though. Otherwise, it would probably have been a bit unreadable. Instead, the book hugged the science lightly around anecdotes, including some hilarious stories from de Waal’s years spent observing chimpanzees as well as an entire chapter comparing Donald Trump to alpha chimps (spoiler: the comparison isn’t particularly flattering for The Donald).

What lingered with me the most about this book, however, besides learning all kinds of new information, was the questions about animal welfare it brought to light. We still test products on animals in the United States. We keep chimps in cages, away from their family. We have beagles who spend their entire lives in laboratories, never feeling grass, or smelling the scents of the world. We slaughter animals inhumanely and without much thought. And how do we assuage our guilt and shame over these atrocities? We convince ourselves that animals can’t feel, that they don’t experience pain or terror or curiosity. They live in the moment, we often say about our dogs. They don’t know the difference between yesterday and today and tomorrow. But if Frans de Waal’s research is to be believed, that’s not entirely true. And if it isn’t, it raises some questions we might not like the answers to.

All in all, I would highly recommend Mama’s Last Hug to those who love animals, and to anyone who is interested in the most recent science into the animal (and therefore, human) mind.

Give me your favorite animal anecdote in the comments!

Buy Links:

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❤ Always,

Aimee

Book Review: Monday’s Not Coming

Trigger/Content Warnings: Domestic violence, child abuse, child neglect, homophobia, bullying, missing persons.


41xccpePQhL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_Official Blurb: 

Monday Charles is missing, and only Claudia seems to notice. Claudia and Monday have always been inseparable—more sisters than friends. So when Monday doesn’t turn up for the first day of school, Claudia’s worried.

When she doesn’t show for the second day, or second week, Claudia knows that something is wrong. Monday wouldn’t just leave her to endure tests and bullies alone. Not after last year’s rumors and not with her grades on the line. Now Claudia needs her best—and only—friend more than ever. But Monday’s mother refuses to give Claudia a straight answer, and Monday’s sister April is even less help.

As Claudia digs deeper into her friend’s disappearance, she discovers that no one seems to remember the last time they saw Monday. How can a teenage girl just vanish without anyone noticing that she’s gone?

My Take: 5/5 Stars

Rumors are born with legs that can run a mile in less than a minute. Rumors eat up dreams without condiments. Rumors do not have expiration dates. Rumors can be deadly. Rumors can get you killed

~ Tiffany D. Jackson

Tiffany Jackson’s MONDAY’S NOT COMING is outside my usual reading lane. I bought it on sale on Audible because it was recommended by Audible and because the blurb sounded interesting. It is proof that I should read outside my usual reading lane more often. It blew my mind and broke my heart.

Monday’s Not Coming is the type of book that lingers. It sticks with you, hovering there in the back of your mind. It is a cool chill against the skin. It’s the type of book that makes you wonder. What does it mean? What is it trying to say? It’s the type of book that you have to unpack and unravel slowly, over time. It’s a book made for discussion and debate. It’s a book full of characters you will want to hold close and protect. Mainly because you can’t.

This book is so full of love it hurts to turn the pages. Love and grief and twists. You know, in your heart of hearts, where it’s going. You know and yet… you wish you didn’t. You hope you don’t. You cling onto the fragile prayers of the main character as if they are your own. The only you want is to be wrong. It is beautiful and compelling and haunting in so many ways.

It’s really hard to talk about Monday’s Not Coming without spoiling anything because once I find myself talking about it I don’t want to stop. I want to pour out all my feelings and I can’t do that without explaining away so much of what gives this book its power. So I won’t. I will just say that you should read it. Then tell all your friends to read it, too, because you’re going to want someone to discuss it with.

What about you? Do you like a good discussion book? If so, who do you discuss books with?

Buy Links:

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❤ Always,

Aimee

 

Book Review: Finale

Official Blurb: 91xyJ8LjggLWelcome, welcome to Finale, the third and final audiobook in Stephanie Garber’s number one New York Times best-selling Caraval series!

A love worth fighting for. A dream worth dying for. An ending worth waiting for.

It’s been two months since the Fates were freed from a deck of cards, two months since Legend claimed the throne for his own, and two months since Tella discovered the boy she fell in love with doesn’t really exist.

With lives, empires, and hearts hanging in the balance, Tella must decide if she’s going to trust Legend or a former enemy. After uncovering a secret that upends her life, Scarlett will need to do the impossible. And Legend has a choice to make that will forever change and define him.

Caraval is over, but perhaps the greatest game of all has begun. There are no spectators this time: only those who will win and those who will lose everything.

Welcome, welcome to Finale. All games must come to an end….

My Take: 5/5 Stars

Occasionally, there are minutes that get extra seconds. Moments so precious the universe stretches to make additional room for them.

~Stephanie Garber

FINALE was my second most anticipated read of the year (right after KING OF SCARS) and it did not disappoint even a little bit. By page 55 my heart was thumping, and I was in a frenzy. I squealed in glee, I gnashed my teeth in anticipation, I growled in frustration. I would put the book down so I could savor it only to start twitching, desperate to pick it back up. I read it, naturally, in one sitting. I was frustrated with myself for being unable to read faster yet irritated with my need-to-know nature because I knew I would be devastated by the time the book was over and my hands were empty.

Predictable. I am so, so very predictable. Because I did read it too fast, and I was upset when I had no more book. I felt like that inquisitive yet sad character in one’s mind who picks up the book and shakes its pages a little, hoping more story will fall out. Sadly, this was the end of the legend of Legend and Donatella and Scarlett. But I look back and realize that I loved every single moment of following them, which is surprising considering (in my humble opinion) it is hard to pull off a good close. This was a good close. Yet it left enough open that I thought about it and thought about it and considered reopening my fanfiction.net account for some good old fashioned wish fulfillment. Because, I don’t do spoilers here, but there was one someone I wanted to see more of. (As an aside, when you want to write fanfiction about a book, the author has done it right).

The world of Caraval has been magical, but the thing that pulled me back every time were the characters. Especially Tella. Fierce, stubborn, brilliant Tella. When I read Caraval, I loved Scarlett so much I could barely contain myself. I loved her because she was something you don’t see often in YA fantasy: she was soft and cautious and agency came slowly to her. Tella, in a nutshell, is a girl like me. So when I opened up Legendary, I was nervous at first to see it was from Tella’s point of view. But then I realized Tella was amazing in a different way. Tella was the girl I want to be. And seeing them both evolve and shift and grow and change has been a complete joy. Stephanie Garber is the kind of writer I aspire to me. The kind of writer who is unapologetic and honest. Whose characters draw you back time and time again.

I have no idea what is in store next for Stephanie, but whatever it is, you can be sure I’ll be lining up to get my hands on it.

This week’s question: What’s your favorite (finished) series?

To Enter Caraval Read These First: 

Caraval Buy Links:

Amazon

Audible

iTunes

Barnes & Noble

To Finish the Legend of Legend Read These:

Finale Buy Links:

Amazon

Audible

iTunes

Barnes & Noble

❤ Aimee