2018 Writing Goals

Well… 2017 has been a bit of a rough one if I’m honest (which I try to be). It’s been a difficult year to create for me and many others if Twitter is to be believed. But when I sit down and push all the noise aside, I realize I did accomplish quite a bit in the last year, which I will now reflect on.

  • I hit (and surpassed) the elusive 100 book sales mark for my debut novel The Wheel Mages.
    • Note: 90% of self-published books will sell less than 100 copies, so this is a real accomplishment even if it doesn’t seem like much in terms of sales numbers.

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  • I published the second book in my Changing Tides series, The Blood Mage.

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  • Although I didn’t make into Pitch Wars this year, I did enter, which was quite a feat. Plus, it means I have a novel ready to query for (hopefully) a traditional publishing deal. The King’s Blade features a diverse cast of characters including a triumvirate of Deep Sea power by way of a competent assassin, a mermaid magician and scientist, a young king who has a knack for political maneuvers and on land, you’ll find a human prince who is softer than my average male character and a budding naturalist himself. I did more research for The King’s Blade than anything I’ve ever worked on, and I am immensely proud of it. Read more about it here.

With all that said, I do have some pretty serious writing goals for 2018. Let’s see if I can accomplish them!

  1. Create a real marketing strategy for my Changing Tides Series and execute, execute, execute!
  2. Pay off the editing fees for The Blood Mage.
  3. Finish the draft of the third book in my Changing Tides Series and get it out for developmental edits at the very least.
  4. Start querying The King’s Blade for a traditional deal.
  5. Finish my beta reads!
  6. Read, read, read (my TBR is out of this world and I can’t seem to stop buying more things to add to it!)

All you writers out there: What did you accomplish in 2017 and what are some of your goals for the New Year?

Happy Holidays everyone!

❤ Aimee

 

Self v. Traditional Publishing: It’s Not a Rivalry

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I saw this ^^ meme making the rounds on Twitter recently. It was being shared mostly by writers who are querying for traditional publishing deals or are working toward one.

The comments that went along with it were worse. And in the interest of honesty, because that’s what I do here, I’ll go ahead and tell y’all I cried.

I’m not usually a crier. It’s fine if you are, but I’m not. I was a bit surprised at my reaction, but I was having a particularly difficult day. My sales have been almost zero (I’ll be posting them in early April for those who may have wondered), I’d just returned from a workshop I was supposed to be leading that no one showed up to after putting in my fifth day in a row of working 17+ hours, and I was emotionally exhausted. So I cried. Then I wrote a blog post on failure (well into hour 21 of working) and put the puffin and Twitter out of my mind to get a few hours sleep and start again.

I really didn’t think I was going to come back to the puffin, but… well, here I am.

I know I talk about this sometimes ad nauseum, but I have a traditional publishing education. If you were to look at my Twitter feed, you’d probably think I was a traditionally published author (or aspiring to be one). Most of the books I read are written by traditional authors as are most of the people I follow. The seminar I just attended in Tennessee was full of those on the traditional track (I actually think I was the only self-published author there). And yes, there were a few hurtful jokes made that I chuckled off because at the end of the day I get it.

In some ways, I used to be right there with the people sharing tongue-in-cheek jabs at self-published authors on Twitter. I came into this with bias, and I still have it (hence my TBR pile). But sharing memes like the one above on social media does literally nothing except hurt people who are chasing a dream exactly the same as yours.

Let me repeat that. Writers looking for traditional publishing deals want the same thing as writers considering self-publishing: to have their words read.

Some of us want to be able to make enough money to write full-time (I fall into this category), some of us want a movie deal, some of us want to see our books on the shelves at Barnes & Noble, some of us just want to throw our heart onto the page and maybe have some friends and family read it. What we want changes in shade but not color because all of these things share the same base–people reading our books.

And just like in every career, there are multiple ways to achieve the same goal. 

Now, I don’t know of any self-published authors who have big movie deals (if you do, please do share!), so if the shade of your desire is Hollywood, yeah, you should probably query and get an agent and go the traditional route. But if you just want to throw a book out there to say you’ve done this thing, then there’s no reason you need to query for years and sit around waiting to see if a Big Five Press will take your book. And guess what? There are variations of all kinds in between. Maybe you want an indie press because you’re not interested in New York. Maybe you want to be one of the successful big name self-published authors. Maybe you want to be a hybrid author who does a little bit of Big Five and a little bit of self-publishing. Cool. Every single one of these is a legitimate path. But there is absolutely no reason to trash a path you chose against. That. Shit. Is. Personal.

There is garbage in the self-publishing world. I’ve read it. There is garbage in traditional publishing. I’ve read that too. There are gems in self-publishing (I happen to think I’ve created one, but judge for yourself). And there are gems in traditional. And there’s stuff that’s “meh” in both too. There’s stuff for me and stuff for you. There’s four stars and two.

Okay, now that I sound a little bit like Dr. Seuss, moving along.

This industry is hard. Traditional publishing has challenges self-publishing does not and vice versa. We all fail. I’m failing right now. The uncertainty is scary, and sometimes, when we’re uncertain, it helps us bolster our own decisions by tearing others down. It’s easy, I think, to say, “Well at least my work isn’t so bad that no publishing house would have me!” Ahahaha.

Fact: I did not query. Not one single time. I chose this. My decision to self-publish has literally nothing to do with the quality of my work and has everything to do with my desire to have complete creative control because I was sick of having mental illness and addiction and trauma take my voice away. I wasn’t about to hand it over to a Big Five press after I’d struggled to regain it. The fact that my book doesn’t have Penguin Random House on the inside cover doesn’t mean that Penguin Random House “wouldn’t have me” and to say so is to show your own ignorance about what goes on in the self-publishing world.

Don’t be ignorant. It’s okay to listen. It’s okay to come to a conclusion that traditional publishing has its flaws and self-publishing has its flaws and there are reasons to do or not to do either without having to de-legitimize the other. I know we live in a very “this side or that side” kind of time, but how someone chooses to go about getting his/her/their books into the hands of readers really doesn’t have to be that kind of issue. I promise.

So please, don’t let your fears trample my dream.

The Last Birthday

Today, I turn 29. I’m joking it’s the last birthday I’ll ever celebrate. I’m almost not a twenty-something anymore, and it feels a bit like losing a shield. But in all seriousness, it’s really just another day.

That said, it’s another day where I shall go ahead and do some self promotion. Because it’s MY day (also George Washington’s, any other Pisces in the house?)

I’m going to share with you all some of my favorite reviews of The Wheel Mages and hope to convince you that if you haven’t jumped into the world of the Sanctum yet, now’s the time (looking at you Maas fans, we have until May until her next book is released).

So… without further ado, here we go! Read to the end – there’s also NEWS. And sign up for my newsletter! I’m getting it all in today, y’all.

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News! My trilogy is no longer a trilogy. I know, I know, I had reservations about this as well which I plan to completely outline in a post later this week or next week, but I promise the decision was not taken lightly and it was very thoroughly discussed and debated with my team of trusted beta readers as well as my editor. In the end, expanding the series was the best choice for the characters.

Have a great day everyone!

❤ Aimee

Broken and Built Anew

Do not think of today’s failures, but of the success that may come tomorrow.”

~ Helen Keller

Last week, I was ready to give up. This probably has something to do with the fact that my birthday is next week. I’m going to be 29.

Sarah Maas is 30 (8 books), Victoria Aveyard is 26 (3 books), Veronica Roth is 28 (4 books), Marissa Meyer is 32 (6 books). This doesn’t include novellas, compilations, short stories, collections, etc.

I felt too old to be only just starting.

I know, it probably sounds ridiculous. I shouldn’t be comparing myself to other writers, especially not those who are traditionally published and anyway, 29 isn’t that old! But I felt old and tired and exhausted and beaten and defeated and… broken.

I have wanted to be a writer since I could hold a pen(cil). I never really dream hopped. I didn’t want to be a veterinarian one day and an astronaut the next. If you asked me at age 6 what I wanted to be, I would have told you I wanted to be an author, ask me at 16, a novelist, at 22, a writer.

My dream has never changed, but I still managed to get so, so lost. For years, I struggled through a quagmire of mental health issues ranging from addiction to depression to agoraphobia to self-mutilation to panic attacks. I have insomnia. When I do sleep, I have terrible nightmares and night terrors. I spent years undereating only to then spend years overeating. My weight is in a constant state of confusion. I’ve weighed 106 pounds and 206 pounds and everywhere in between. Living is often exhausting for me. And last week, I thought, “You know what, this is hard enough as it is, why make it more complicated? Accept mediocrity. Accept that you’re never going to make it. It’s okay to be average. You don’t have to be special. You wake up every day and for someone with as many problems as you have, that’s enough. Enough is enough. Just stop.”

There is peace to be found in surrender. Peace sounded good. Surrender sounded good. Curling up under a comforter and never coming back out sounded good.

But none of those things are actually options. Not for me. Not when I feel so deeply that God has blessed me with a special gift—the gift of knowing what I want to do with my life.

I don’t talk about my faith very much, because faith is personal and controversial and for me, hard to nail down. But sometimes, usually in my darkest moments, it whispers to me.

I was not raised with faith. My mother has always identified as a Christian, but she didn’t really rediscover her faith until I was much older. My father is a scientist and like a majority of scientists, he is an atheist. While my mother read me fairy tales in the cradle, my father read me Darwin. When I was in the sixth grade, he bought me a copy of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (“Because it’s a good story”). I was brought up on the belief that religion is a crutch used by those who are desperate.

Maybe it is. Then again, maybe it isn’t. As the daughter of a scientist, I was encouraged to question, to be always curious about the unknown. Fostering curiosity is probably part of what led me to be a writer. It’s also what guided me to my faith.

I converted to Catholicism my sophomore year of college. I started attending mass because I was in love with a Catholic boy, and I wanted to impress him. I decided to convert because I felt like I’d found something that had been missing inside me, but I’d be lying if I said it’s been easy. I’ve struggled with my faith every day since the day I converted. I’m constantly questioning it just as I’m constantly questioning myself. But sometimes, I think I hear God’s voice, and it gets me through the day.

In that way, I guess my faith is a crutch. But a crutch helps those who cannot walk for themselves. A crutch helps broken people heal. It is exactly what I needed last week, and I clung to it until my knuckles turned white. And eventually, I found myself walking a little stronger, a little further. I found my despair easing its hold. Ideas started to flow again as hope sprang back to life inside me, a small ember at first, a tiny thing I had to nurture, but it was there all the same.

There’s something magical about being on the precipice of defeat and clawing your way back. There’s something empowering about being lost and finding your way again. There’s a reason the image of the phoenix rising from the ash is so popular, and it’s because never has there been a symbol that encompasses the human spirit so well. At some point in our lives, every single one of us has been the phoenix risen from darkness.

Last week, it was me. But I have risen stronger than before. My dream is more beautiful because it was broken. It will be so much more exciting when I make it a reality because I will remember the taste of the ash on my tongue and the burning in my throat as I fought my way back into the light.

Broken and built anew.

Never stop dreaming. Never stop fighting.

❤ Aimee

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Valentine’s Day and News

Okay! So… I finally did it y’all. I finally made a newsletter… well… sort of. I made a mailing list, which you can sign up for by clicking on the link to the right of your screen where I joyfully declare I have done a thing. Or you can click here.

We’ll see. I’m still not convinced on the newsletter thing, but I recently had a discussion with a beta reader who told me she does in fact read author newsletters, so I bit the bullet and did it. I’m hoping to send them monthly, and I won’t sell your information and all that good SEC stuff here.

Now, the information that would go in a February newsletter but didn’t because I didn’t create such a thing until today is as follows:

Valentine’s Day is tomorrow, people! In honor of the holiday and in honor of my first in I don’t know how long Valentine’s Day single, I will be teasing the new novel all day tomorrow in 140 characters or less. That’s right everyone, #TheBloodMage is going to be rocking it on Twitter. If you don’t follow me on Twitter, you can find me @writingwaimee or click here. I’m allll about the links today.

Of course there will be gooey goodness, and the hashtag for the day will be #TheBloodMage. It’s not only about amorous affections though, there will be some other kinds of love on display as well, and I promise it will be spoiler free.

As a preview, here’s one of the fun ones I pulled yesterday that didn’t make the 140 character cutoff but was too good to ignore. This is about one of the new lead’s love affair with the loveliest of all full-bodied flavors—wine.

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Writing Workshop in Reading, PA – My workshop which was originally going to be in mid-February was rearranged, so it will now be happening on March 22nd with details to come (in the new newsletter so go ahead and sign up for that if you want to meet me live and in the flesh, because I’m not going to tell you where it is except in the newsletter!)

The Blood Mage – Comes back from the editor sometime today. In case you couldn’t tell, by all the links and the rambling, I’m a bit nervous. We’ll see how it goes!

And that’s a wrap! Happy V-Day everyone, and make sure to click on some of my fancy new links!

❤ Aimee

 

For Book Bloggers: How to Entice an Author

As you all might remember, I’m in the process of querying for reviews. This is a long and ongoing process, but during it, I’ve come to realize something quite interesting: book bloggers and authors have a lot more in common than one might suspect.

The relationship between book blogger/reviewer and author should be a symbiotic one. From an author’s point of view, the book blogger is a valuable marketing tool who can open the book up to different audiences the author hasn’t been able to reach yet (especially in the case of us debut, indie authors). From the book blogger’s point of view (book bloggers, correct me if I’m wrong), the author is offering a free product the blogger enjoys (hopefully). The relationship also works both ways in that the author is pitching to the blogger, but the blogger is also pitching to the author.

A brief Google search tells me there are as many articles out there about how to develop a good book blog as there are how to market your book to book bloggers. What I didn’t see, though, was talk about this from the author’s perspective. My guess is this might be because it’s sort of faux pas for an author to discuss what she’s looking for in a book blog, but I try to be real here, so I’m going to go ahead and do that, and hopefully, we can learn some things together.

Okay, so for new writers who are reading this who aren’t reviewers, let me set this up very briefly: The author/publisher solicits to book bloggers via query asking the blogger to review the book. If the blogger accepts, the book is provided free of charge in whatever format the blogger desires and the blogger reviews it based on his/her review policy.

The part of this equation I want to hone in on is the part before the query—the part where the author/publisher searches for the book blog to query. This is the part I think book bloggers (especially those who are trying to develop their blogs) might be interested in. Because, just like you choose which queries to accept, we authors choose which bloggers to query to in the first place.

So… you as a book blogger want to attract authors to your blog, IG, etc.? Fantastic. I’m going to share with you the things I look for when choosing which blogs to query.

1. Review Policies – Have one, and make it readily accessible. A review policy is the very first thing I check on any book blog. The reason for this is because there are some bloggers who won’t accept indie authors. If you don’t want to solicit to us indies, that’s totally fine. I understand why you’re not interested, and it doesn’t hurt my feelings, but if you don’t take indies, go ahead and put that right up front. It saves me time and effort, and I very much appreciate it. If you do accept self-published books and authors, make sure to put that in there, too. Also, if you’re not currently accepting requests, please put that in your review policy (and keep it up to date). I keep a list of bloggers to check back with periodically, so I won’t forget you. No need to take on more than you can handle. It sours the experience, and I want you to love reading my book!

Review policies are both our friends. They make everything simple for both parties, and I’ll make sure to follow your policy to the letter. As an aside, I think you’re completely right for rejecting someone who doesn’t, and if I fail to, shame on me.

2. About – The “About Me” section of a book blog is the second thing I check. I personalize every query I write, and I want to know a little bit about you so I can figure out if my work is in your wheelhouse. I don’t want to waste your time (or mine). If you say you’ll read anything, but you actually like mystery, you’re either not going to like my book or you’re not going to read it. There are so many books out there, there’s no need for you to waste your time reading books you don’t like. Tell me what you enjoy. This is important from the author side too, because every book I send out costs me money, so I want to make sure every book goes into the hands of someone who at least enjoys the genre.

In addition to knowing what books you like to read, I also want to know about you—how old are you, where are you from, what are some of your hobbies? I want to learn a little bit about you so I can determine if my work will speak to you. An author who’s doing her homework will do her very best to make sure she presents you with something that’s enjoyable to you. You’re special, and a query should make you feel that way, so give me some material to work with.

3. The Website – I have, at this point, looked through literally hundreds of book blogs. I’ve queried to 22. I strike a lot of blogs at this stage, but because this is the most variable, I can’t really speak to what all authors/publishers are looking for in terms of website. I can, however, speak to what I’m looking for.

  • Links that work. This is important. If I click on a tab that’s supposed to take me to reviews, and I get a page unknown error, I will strike the blog. If I can’t get to your reviews, how are other people supposed to get to them and read about my book?
  • A clean and simple design. I am not a website designer (obviously), so I try not to make too many judgments, but I do like clean sites. If the website is jumbled and confusing or has too many tabs or topics, I will usually pass. Remember, this isn’t only a book I’m trying to sell, it’s a brand, and I want to associate it with clean, simple, accessible, professional.
  • Followers/Social Media Links. The amount of followers you have on your blog is not a deal breaker for me, but if you’re trying to solicit big names (especially publishers), it will be. Don’t despair, there are indie authors (like me) and authors from smaller presses who are willing to grow with you. That said, if you have a bookish Instagram or a Twitter or a Facebook or a Snap-it (sorry, was my disdain for Snapchat coming through there?) absolutely link it to your blog. I check that, too, and if you’re willing to share my work over more platforms than your blog, that’s a HUGE bonus to me.
    • I should probably note, too, that number of followers isn’t the only important thing, I also look at the number of people who are engaging with your posts in the form of comments and likes. Like I said, not a deal breaker for me either way, but I want to add it because if I’m noticing that, it would be a wise bet to assume publishers and agents and marketing professionals are noticing it too.

4. The Reviews – Are you surprised to find these so far down my list? Yeah, interesting that, isn’t it? Okay, so if your blog has made it this far, it’s time for me to really sit down and delve into things.

First, let me put this right out front: I do not expect a five star review from anyone, but I do expect my work to be treated with respect. If I see you trashing other authors from here to Venus, no matter how much I may agree with you, I will not query you. Plain and simple: Every time you trash an author there’s another author reading it and thinking, “That could be my book.” I’ve read this same advice given from very successful book bloggers to new bloggers, and I couldn’t agree with it more. Listen to the people who are doing it well. They’re right. This industry means we have to have thick skins, but we’re still people, and we’ve put a lot of time and energy and money into these books. When we send you a book, we’re not sending you a $10 lump of paper or a $3.99 chunk of internet ether, we’re sending you a piece of our souls, thousands of hours of time and, in the case of indie authors, thousands upon thousands of dollars of our own hard-earned cash. It matters to us, especially to those of us who are new to the industry. Anyone who has read this blog for any amount of time knows how much I care about honesty in all things, but I also believe very strongly that you can be honest and still respectful.

Okay, less heavy stuff:

  • Keep your blog up to date. If you haven’t posted a review in three months, I’ll likely strike you. I’ll also check to make sure the reviews are coming at a relatively steady pace. I completely understand you’re busy and it’s not perfect, and you’re not getting paid to do this, and I’m happy to wait, but if I see month-long gaps in posts happening regularly, I hope you’ll understand when I say there’s no guarantee you’ll ever get around to reading my book, so it’s better if I go to someone who will.
  • Along those same lines, make sure your posts are dated. If they’re not, I can’t determine the above, and I’ll err on the side of caution and hold on to my book.
  • Have some reviews of big names in the genre you’re reviewing. Even if you’re specializing in reviewing indie authors (you’re an awesome soul if you’re doing this), throwing in a few of the big names from the big presses can be helpful to an author trying to gauge what kind of books you like. I write young adult high fantasy so the first reviews I read on a blog are any written on anything by Sarah J. Maas, Leigh Bardugo, Cassandra Clare, Marissa Meyer, Kiera Cass, Victoria Aveyard, or Veronica Roth. I’ve read all the works of most of these authors and know how I would rate their work compared to my own, so knowing how you do it gives me a better idea of whether or not you’ll like my work. If you only gave Maas’ Court of Mist and Fury 2.5 stars, I can pretty much assure you that you are not interested in The Wheel Mages, and I won’t send it. That is not to say your opinion isn’t valid, it’s just to say there are authors out there for you that aren’t me.
    • Side Note: J.K. Rowling is not on my list of big names because I almost never read reviews of J.K. Rowling’s work. Everyone loves it, so it isn’t a good indicator of preference for me.
  • Other than what I talked about above, I don’t really care about stars, except to see that not every book is getting five stars but some books are. Like I said, I don’t expect my book to get five stars every time, but if you’re not giving five stars to anyone, I’m leery. That said, if you’re giving five stars to everyone it’s also a red flag to me. I also want to add that I appreciate how hard your job is to assign ratings to something so subjective. It’s not one I think I could do – so kudos to you.
  • If you don’t give stars, that’s almost better. There aren’t many book blogs that don’t give stars, but I really like the ones that simply write a review. They’re refreshing and from the author’s perspective, a little less scary. Of course, readers probably feel differently, and you have to appeal to us both, so it’s all good either way.
  • Make me want to read the book you’re reviewing (if your objective is to say it was really good and everyone should read it). After I check for the authors I know, I will read a review about a book I don’t know that’s received a good review. If I walk away wanting to read that book, I’ll query you. You’ve done your job for me and that’s admittedly hard to do, so I know you’ll do it for others as well. There are tons of ways to accomplish this, but the way I find most persuasive is precise language with a spark of personality. I know, it’s tough, I’m telling you, I don’t envy you guys.
  • Review lists are great. I won’t strike a blog for not having a clickable list of reviews by title or author, but they’re awesome when I see them.

Wow, okay, this post is long, but I’m hoping helpful. I just want to add something really quickly here: This is obviously not an exact formula. Nothing about this industry is exact. It’s simply a set of ideas from the other side of the equation. And please note I realize I am not like every indie author. I’m sure there are plenty of authors who don’t put as much time into querying as I do, but I happen to think the amount of time I put into it speaks to who I am and what my book is. If you like that, this is how to catch someone like me.

Finally, I think I made it clear throughout, but in case I didn’t, I want you to know, book bloggers, that I appreciate you so, so much. I actually think authors might be able to commiserate with you more than most. We’re all writers who love books, struggling to make ourselves stand out in an over-saturated market, driving ourselves crazy in the process. So much love to you.

Keep on keeping on, and if you have anything you’d like to contribute or ask about, sound off in the comments.

❤ Aimee

P.s. If you’re a book blogger interested in enticing indie authors and don’t know where to start, get on this list! http://www.theindieview.com/indie-reviewers/

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Seemed appropriate

Your Relationship with Your Editor

Author’s note: I currently have three posts ready to go, but all of them are somewhat controversial, and I’m having trouble finding the courage to hit the publish button, so I thought I’d write this one as my second book, The Blood Mage, is headed to the editor on January 30th (11 days, eek!)


In the end, what makes a book valuable is not the paper it’s printed on, but the thousands of hours of work by dozens of people who are dedicated to creating the best possible reading experience for you.

~ John Green

I’ve written about the importance of professional editing before. Recently, however, as I slog my way through edits for my second book, I’ve come to appreciate the relationship I have with my editor much, much more.

You see, as I did some quick research for this post, which was originally set to be a piece on why professional editing is so important for indie authors, I came to realize a lot of writers have a contentious relationship with editors. Some of the things writers have said about editors is… less than kind.

I can’t help but wonder if this uneasy relationship is created more by the writer or by the publishing house. I do understand it’s difficult to have your work critiqued (you can check out a short retelling of the temper tantrum I threw when my manuscript came back from the editor in the blog I linked to above). But I also have to wonder if some of this unease comes from the traditionally published author being forced by his publishing house to work with an editor he doesn’t click with.

Not every professional relationship in your life needs to be the perfect fit. It doesn’t matter so much if you like your accountant, for example. It helps, to be sure, but as long as everything is done properly, there doesn’t really need to be chemistry. There are some professional relationships, however, where chemistry is extremely important. Editors fall into this second category (therapists, doctors, and teachers also come to mind).

And I’m not talking about chemistry in terms of you and your editor are BFFs, although some writers do share that relationship with their editors. I’m talking about professional chemistry which, in my experience, is premised upon mutual respect and, most importantly, trust.

Trust, especially in the self-publishing world, is incredibly important, because let’s be honest, there are a lot of people out there trying to scam indie authors (and succeeding at it). We don’t have publishing houses behind us to protect us from these people. A lot of us don’t even have agents. Publishing houses and agents will protect traditionally published authors because it’s in their best interests to do so. But, as in all things indie, we must fill that void and step up to protect our own interests, which means finding an editor we can trust not only with our money, but also with our writing.

All this leads me to a few bullet points which are indicative of a good relationship with your editor:

  • Your editor is enthusiastic about your work. If your editor isn’t proud to put his or her name on your book, something is wrong. My editor was as excited about my book launch as I was. She shared my book on her social media platforms and put it in her newsletter. If she hadn’t been excited to put her name on it, I would have been very, very worried. Your book is not only a reflection of you but also your editor, and if your editor doesn’t want to claim it, you might have a problem.
  • Your editor takes time to listen to your concerns and questions surrounding her suggestions. The editing process should be a collaboration. We are indie authors for a reason. This is not the way it used to be where editors in publishing houses were handed the manuscript and a red pen, and the author was handed a blindfold and handcuffs. All right, this is an exaggeration, but you get where I’m going. One of the nice things about being an indie author is increased creative control. This means that your editor should never be steamrolling you. Improving your manuscript should be a conversation, and your editor should be happy to participate. My editor is very intuitive about my characters and my writing, so to be honest, I don’t usually have a ton of questions for her, but when I do, her responses are always thoughtful, and most of the time, I end up coming up with something that is a combination of my vision and hers that works better than either of our original ideas.
  • Your editor is interested in your long-term success as an author. This actually is just good business sense. Your editor should want you to be successful so you keep coming back. Also, the more successful you are, the more their reputation grows. An editor interested in maintaining long-term relationships with clients is an editor who is vested in the success of their clients. My editor helped me answer questions related not only to writing, but also to the industry. When she didn’t have the answers, she would point me in the direction of someone who did. She wants me to succeed, because it will help her succeed. This should always be a symbiotic relationship. An editor who couldn’t care less when your next book is coming out, is an editor who isn’t invested in you or your career and by extension, your writing.

If you have these three things in an editor, you’re probably well on your way to a good relationship. And trust me, in this industry, you’re going to need it.

For a list of editors to consider, I will refer you to Joanna Penn’s: http://www.thecreativepenn.com/editors/

For information on my editor, the fabulous Katie McCoach, visit her site here: http://katiemccoach.com/

Have any other advice for a happy and healthy relationship with an editor? Add it to the comments!

Happy editing everyone!

❤ Aimee

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I shared this on my Facebook the other day and thought it was appropriate for this post. I’m so proud to have published my debut novel with an all female team. Girl power, y’all.